Peugeot Teams Up With 3D Printing Startup for Parts and Possibly Full Cars

Daniel Bentley for Fortune:  French carmaker PSA said on Thursday a partnership with a U.S. 3D printing startup would lead to cheaper production of whole vehicle structures as well as parts for its models. The maker of Peugeot, Citroen and DS cars said it had agreed with Los Angeles-based Divergent 3D to develop metal printing processes for PSA production lines. Carlos Tavares, PSA’s chief executive, said this could “dramatically scale down the size and scope of our manufacturing footprint” and yield lighter, more profitable vehicles. The carmaker did not quantify any impact on production jobs. Industries from aerospace to healthcare use 3D printing for the production of metal and plastic components, while elaborate assemblies with moving parts often prove more difficult. Ford is among other carmakers exploring the technology.   Cont'd...

3D printed designs easily stolen by nearby smartphone

Jack Loughran for E&T:  3D printers have been shown to be vulnerable to attack by smartphones that can steal designs by being within close proximity during the printing process. A study from the University at Buffalo, USA explored security vulnerabilities in 3D printing, also called additive manufacturing, which analysts say will become a multibillion-dollar industry employed to build everything from rocket engines to heart valves. "Many companies are betting on 3D printing to revolutionise their businesses, but there are still security unknowns associated with these machines that leave intellectual property vulnerable," said assistant professor Wenyao Xu, who worked on the project.   Cont'd...

3D Printers in Schools

Just imagine: students are working in a classroom at their computers modeling their projects, then 3D print their models. Some time ago it would look like a fantasy, now it's going to be a reality.

GE speeds up 3D printing push with bids for SLM, Arcam

Johannes Hellstrom and Maria Sheahan  for Reuters:  General Electric launched bids on Tuesday to buy two of the world's top makers of machines for metal-based 3D printing - Sweden's Arcam and Germany's SLM Solutions - for a total $1.4 billion to bolster its position in the fast-growing technology. 3D printing has been used to build prototypes for decades but has become more widespread for industrial mass production in recent years, with uses including the production of dental crowns, medical implants and light aircraft parts. GE has long been one of the main proponents of industrial 3D printing, using it to make fuel nozzles for its new LEAP jet engine in what marked a big step in using the technology in mass production.   Cont'd...

Two Game-Changing Approaches for Manufacturers

Many organizations are successfully applying new technologies to the production of finished goods and their expert leaders gather at industry events and executive meetings to discuss emerging trends.

The Manufacturing Process In 8 Easy Steps

The manufacturing process is a lot less intimidating when it's broken down into a series of steps, so let's do that right now:

Additive Manufacturing Boosts Prototyping of Medical Devices

The 3D CAD model enabled client to easily visualize the design and suggest necessary changes quickly.

This new 3D-printing pen draws with wood, copper, and bronze

James Vincent for The Verge:  3Doodler's 3D-printing pens have always had a lot of potential (who doesn't want a souped-up glue gun that can draw 3D structures in midair?), but in our hands-on with the pens, their rough build quality means they come across more as toys than serious design tools. The company's latest model, the 3Doodler Pro, wants to shake up this perception, offering professional users more control, faster-setting plastics, and a whole new range of materials to work with. Some of the new filaments on offer are pretty wild, too. 3Doodler says the Pro supports materials including wood, copper, bronze, nylon, and polycarbonate. Obviously, this doesn't mean you'll be sticking a length of dowel in the back of the Pro to draw tiny pieces of wooden furniture — instead, these new materials blend elements of their namesake into the plastic standard filament.   Cont'd...

Oak Ridge tool takes world record for largest 3D-printed object

Michael Irving for New Atlas:  Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is no stranger to impressive 3D printing feats, with a replica 1965 Shelby Cobra and a dwelling and vehicle which can power each other, already under its belt. Now a new plane wing trim-and-drill tool developed and 3D printed by ORNL has been certified by Guinness World Records as the largest solid 3D printed item. Made from carbon fiber and ABS thermoplastic composite materials, the new tool measures 17.5 x 5.5 x 1.5 ft (5.3 x 1.7 x 0.5 m) and weighs around 1,650 lb (748 kg). To meet the requirements of the record, the item needed to be one solid piece of 10.6 cubic ft (0.3 cubic m), which a Guinness World Records judge confirmed at a ceremony.   Cont'd...

Going Beyond 3D Printing to Add a New Dimension for Additive Manufacturing

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory:  A team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers has demonstrated the 3D printing of shape-shifting structures that can fold or unfold to reshape themselves when exposed to heat or electricity. The micro-architected structures were fabricated from a conductive, environmentally responsive polymer ink developed at the Lab. In an article published recently by the journal Scientific Reports (link is external), lab scientists and engineers revealed a strategy for creating boxes, spirals and spheres from shape memory polymers (SMPs), bio-based "smart" materials that exhibit shape-changes when resistively heated or when exposed to the appropriate temperature. Lab researcher Jennifer Rodriguez examines a 3D printed box that was "programmed" to fold and unfold when heated While the approach of using responsive materials in 3D printing, often known as "4D printing," is not new, LLNL researchers are the first to combine the process of 3D printing and subsequent folding (via origami methods) with conductive smart materials to build complex structures.   Cont'd...

A New Effort to Teach Low-Income Students Marketable Skills

Mikahail Zinshteyn for The Atlantic:  The Obama administration is rolling out an experimental plan that will allow employers and training programs to partner with accredited universities to teach students work-related skills. This pilot will enable students to receive federal financial aid for programs that are typically ineligible for these funds, like coding boot camps. By pairing traditional universities with companies that train workers for in-demand fields like computer coding and advanced manufacturing, the U.S. Department of Education hopes to create a new model for delivering high-quality academic credentials to workers in a shorter period of time.  Cont'd...

Industry 4.0 - Interview with Ltd

Since the factory of the future ought to be connected with its clients, we fit perfectly in this schema.

Brookings Report - America's advanced industries: New trends

Brookings Report: ¬ Leaders in cities, metropolitan areas, and states across the country continue to seek ways to reenergize the American economy in a way that works better for more people. To support those efforts, this report provides an update on the changing momentum and geography of America's advanced industries sector-a group of 50 R&D- and STEM (science-technology-engineering-mathematics)-worker intensive industries the vitality of which will be essential for supporting any broadly shared prosperity in U.S. regions. What emerges from the update is a mixed picture of progress and drift that registers continued momentum in the manufacturing sub-sector; a major slump in energy; and strong, widely distributed growth in high-tech services- all of which adds up to a somewhat narrowed map of growth overall. ¬ Cont'd.. .

How 3D Printing Streamlines the Engineering Workflow

Michael Molitch-Hou for  The desktop 3D printing space has become an interesting one in the last year or so, as manufacturers shift the focus away from consumers and towards professional and industrial users. The technology has proven that it may not quite be ready to produce consumer goods for every household—or perhaps households aren't quite ready for 3D printing at home. Those in the industry know, however, that low-cost 3D printing is still a powerful technology, if not for fabricating home goods, then as an early design tool and, in some cases, even for short-run manufacturing.   Cont'd...

3D Printer Market Is Seen as Pillar to Revive Japan's Manufacturing Industry

The SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises), especially the parts manufacturing factories will swell with the success of the 3D printer.

Records 181 to 195 of 385

First | Previous | Next | Last

Featured Product

Zaber's X-LRQ-DE Series: High Precision Stages with Built-in Controllers and Linear Encoders

Zaber's X-LRQ-DE Series: High Precision Stages with Built-in Controllers and Linear Encoders

Zaber's X-LRQ-DE Series of linear stages have high stiffness, load, and lifetime capabilities in a compact size. The integrated linear encoder combined with stage calibration provides high accuracy positioning over the full travel of the device. At 36 mm high, these stages are excellent for applications where a low profile is required. The X-LRQ-DE's innovative design allows speeds up to 205 mm/s and loads up to 100 kg. Like all Zaber products, the X-LRQ-DE Series is designed for easy set-up and operation.