5 ways to advance robotics in manufacturing

Stephanie Condon for ZDNet: The maturity of automated technology used in manufacturing is all over the map, says Carnegie Mellon Prof. Howie Choset, but there are concrete ways to fix that.

Introducing Myriad X: Unleashing AI at the Edge

Remi El-Ouazzane for Intel: The First Vision Processing Unit with a Dedicated Neural Compute Engine will Give Devices the Ability to See, Understand and Interact with the World Around Them in Real Time

Laser ultrasound: the future of metal 3D printing?

Nell Walker for Manufacturing Global: Using laser ultrasound rather than camera imaging, it is hoped that Duttons work could encourage the use of 3D printing within mass manufacturing industries, as it removes the need for a separate inspection process.

Defending 3D Printers From Hackers

Charles Q. Choi for IEEE Spectrum: Researchers reveal three methods of verifying that 3d-printed parts have not been compromised by someone hacking the printer itself.

Space-Based 3-D Printing Reaches Milestone

Mike Wall, SPACE.com: A 3D printer built by the California-based company Made in Space churned out multiple polymer-alloy objects - the largest of which was a 33.5-inch-long (85 centimeters) beam - during a 24-day test inside a thermal vacuum chamber (TVAC) here in Silicon Valley at NASA's Ames Research Center in June.

100x faster, 10x cheaper: 3D metal printing is about to go mainstream

Loz Blain for New Atlas: Desktop Metals Studio System includes a fully-automated, office-friendly sintering furnace with fast cycle times and a peak temperature of 1400°C, allowing for the sintering of a wide variety of materials

The US Navy 3D printed a concept submersible in four weeks

Andrew Liptak for The Verge: The team began work in August 2016, and used a massive industrial 3D Pinter called Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) to manufacture six carbon fiber sections, which were then assembled into the 30 foot long vehicle.

New 3D Printing Technique Significantly Strengthens Materials

Kenny Walter for R&D Magazine: Researchers from Texas A&M University have strengthened 3D printed parts by applying traditional welding concepts to bond the submillimeter layers in a 3D printed part together.

AFRL researchers explore automation, additive technologies for cost efficient solar power

Phys.org: Solar cells can generate electricity in an environmentally friendly way, but current, complex fabrication costs make the technology expensive.

Desktop Metal gets $115 million investment in 3D printing technology

Andy Rosen for The Boston Globe: The company said the amount represents the largest private haul for any 3D printing company focused on metal. Desktop Metal has now raised $212 million since its launch in 2015.

Spider robots on the move for additive manufacturing

Stuart Nathan for The Engineer: Like several concepts in mobile additive manufacture, the Spider bots grew out of a concept to build bases for exploration on the Moon and other planets.

Achieving Lights-Out Manufacturing with Industrial Robots

Kagan Pittman for Engineering.com: The robot combo has been tasked with automating a black oxide process, which involves dipping parts in various chemical baths in a precise sequence.

This NYC Startup Just Raised $5M to Make Manufacturing in America Viable Again

By AlleyWatch: Voodoo Manufacturing is a software-enabled 3D printing factory that works with major brands to produce high-quality products, prototypes and parts at scale.

3D Printing Objects on a Belt Just Became a lot Easier

JP Buntinx for The Merkle: The Printrbelt prints objects on the belt and then moves down the Z axis to get the object onto the surface below

GE Additive and Oerlikon Sign MoU for Additive Manufacturing Collaboration

"GE Additive and Oerlikon both understand the transformative power of additive manufacturing"

Records 46 to 60 of 201

First | Previous | Next | Last

Processing & Handling - Featured Product

Russell Finex - Reclaiming and recycling additive manufacturing powders

Russell Finex - Reclaiming and recycling additive manufacturing powders

The Russell AMPro Sieve Station™ guarantees the quality of your additive manufacturing (AM) powder, and has been designed to provide optimum sieving efficiency, ensuring your powder is ready for use or reuse as and when you require it. With a simple one-button operation and mobile design, this automated check screener ensures your powder at every stage of the process is qualified for use quickly and safely. The flexibility of the Russell AMPro Sieve Station™ means you can use the system for numerous powder handling tasks - being a modular design ensures the machine can be configured to meet your exact requirements.