4 Process Trends Changing Manufacturing

Although some manufacturing leaders and their employees are hesitant to embrace new technology and hardware on the job site, these innovations are here to stay. Those who adapt to these new standards sooner rather than later will be ready to tackle Industry 4.0 and reap all the benefits it has to offer.

Foxconn's Wisconsin plan raises skepticism as well as hope

Rick Barrett, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: The magnitude of Foxconn Technology Groups proposal for a $10 billion electronics factory in southeast Wisconsin is matched by the gravity of the questions it has raised

IIoT and Industry 4.0 are Transforming Manufacturing

At the heart of IIoT is the way companies capture and share data. The ability to have data about inventory needs immediately available in the cloud and available to both plant floor managers and suppliers offers unheard-of visibility that heightens operational performance.

Japan is moving towards Neo-Industrial Manufacturing - Formation of Flexible Factory Partner Alliance

It appears Japanese factories, companies are looking beyond the IOT and or IOE; aiming to connect a variety of assets, e.g., machines, data, technologies, people, and organizations, as well as the existing industries and digital technologies, thereby bringing about the creation of new added value and the solutions to societal problems, bringing "Connected Industries" to fruition.

The ioTrust Security Solution

Manufacturers who can uniquely identify individual parts in a secure manner have an advantage over the competition, which is struggling to master this new concept. With ioTrust, manufacturers can associate their products with a secure, unique identity, that can extend through the supply chain.

Smart Factories Will Deliver $500B In Value By 2022

Louis Columbus for Forbes: Smart factories are revolutionizing manufacturing by enabling a 7X increase in overall productivity by 2022.

The Importance of the Edge for the Industrial Internet of Things in the Energy Industry

For the purposes of this paper, the "edge" is defined as the network entry points or data sources that are in the field on the opposite end of the network from the centralized host. In networking terms, an edge device provides an entry point into enterprise or service provider core networks.

Improving Efficiency in Counting Applications

Now that counting scales can store information electronically, piece count weights can be measured once and stored, rather than weighed again and again each time a new count must be taken.

Japanese companies form alliance to accelerate smart factories

Freddie Roberts for Internet of Business: A group of companies in Japan have formed the Flexible Factory Partner Alliance (FFPA) in order to encourage the use of IoT in factories.

76 Percent of U.S. Workers Do Not Fear Automation, According to Randstad US

It is evident from our research that not only are workers not afraid of losing their jobs to automation, they are more than willing to retrain to leverage the efficiencies and benefits of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics in the workplace

Shop-Floor Digitization for Today's Mid-Size Manufacturer

Every manufacturer needs to figure out what issues or "low hanging fruit" can be addressed to further streamline operations, increase throughput, minimize bottlenecks, and deliver exceptional customer service to maintain or expand their competitive advantage.

The Impact of the IoT Demystified

The IoT is more than a smart meter or the like. It is a complete new wave of automation that includes everything from omni-sensing to artificial intelligence, from smartphones to smart homes, and from smart industries to smart cities.

4 Steps on Your Journey Toward Industry 4.0

We are in the midst of a major shift that is redefining how our manufacturing processes and industry operate. The amount of data collected from connected, digital devices is growing exponentially, enabling more robust business insights.

Cermaq near to completing "smart" factory for salmon

Madelyn Kearns for Seafood Source: "A modern salmon facility takes in the fish, evaluates quality, weight, grading, and during all processes automatically determines which department the fish should go to,"

PLC vs. PAC

PLCs and PACs are similar as they both perform the same essential functions. With modern technology, their differences are becoming more blurred. The most notable difference between PLCs and PACs is their programming interface. PACs are more intricate, using C or C++. PLCs on the other hand, are programmed using ladder logic. These programming differences create distinctions in the architecture and capability between the two computers.

Records 346 to 360 of 676

First | Previous | Next | Last

Automation & Networking - Featured Product

Dynatect Automated Machine Safety Roll-Up Doors

Dynatect Automated Machine Safety Roll-Up Doors

Need to increase safety? Are you using light curtains? Is space a concern? Dynatect's Gortite® VF Automated Machine Safety Door combines safety technology, speed, and a physical barrier to isolate hazardous operations. Use of a physical barrier with safety sensors can save up to 30 square feet of manufacturing space. Using the ANSI minimum safety distance formula, the Gortite® VF Door limits the depth penetration factor and average approach speed, allowing closer location of the safeguarding device. Unlike light curtains, which can't contain process hazards, an automated machine safety door can isolate common workplace debris. This physical barrier is designed to contain process driven hazards such as weld sparks, UV flash, and light debris. Thus, the operator can maintain closer proximity to the work area improving ergonomics and productivity.