Special Tradeshow Coverage for FABTECH 2017

FABTECH 2017 will be held from November 6th - 9th in Chicago, Illinois. This ManufacturingTomorrow.com Special Tradeshow report aims to bring you news, articles and products from this years event.

Apple Wins a Patent for a Future 3D Printing System that works with Augmented Reality and AR Glasses

Patently Apple: Apple notes that there's a need for further applications of a 3D printer, such as extending an existing real object through printing additional objects onto a surface of the existing object by using a 3D printer.

T3D Smartphone 3D Printer Successfully Funded on Kickstarter

Michael Molitch-Hou for Engineering.com: Similar to digital light processing (DLP), layered slices are projected from the phone onto a vat of resin. The print bed is gradually lifted out of the vat with each flash of light until a complete object is revealed.

Laser ultrasound: the future of metal 3D printing?

Nell Walker for Manufacturing Global: Using laser ultrasound rather than camera imaging, it is hoped that Dutton's work could encourage the use of 3D printing within mass manufacturing industries, as it removes the need for a separate inspection process.

Computer scientists design flat sheets that transform themselves into smooth-surfaced, free-form objects

Phys.org: CurveUps are flat materials that transform themselves through material forces into the desired 3-D object.

ZVerse: The 3D Printing Giant Looking To Design A New Content Category

Julian Mitchell for Forbes: LAYR is a cloud-based, end-to-end 3D printing software that makes creating and printing 3D objects easy and efficient.

A 3D-printed rocket engine just launched a new era of space exploration

Candice Majewski for Independent: Members of the team behind the Electron rocket at US company RocketLab say the engine was printed in 24 hours and provides efficiency and performance benefits over other systems.

The factory of the future is here, and it's digitized

Scott Kirsner for Boston Globe: The revolution is about three things: more advanced software for designing things; devices like 3-D printers that can quickly crank out a prototype; and robots and other technologies that will make the factory floor more efficient and flexible.

The future of additive manufacturing is all about design

Sarat Babu for The Engineer: If we're going to unlock the full potential of 3D printing we'll need to fundamentally rethink the design process, writes Sarat Babu, founder of Betatype.

World's Largest Search Engine for 3D Printable Models Launched

After a developing period of 1.5 years 3D Ninja, the largest reseller of 3D printers in The Netherlands, officially launches http://www.ifind3d.com, the world's largest search engine for 3D printable models, containing 740.029 designs.

Adidas reveals the first 3D-printed shoe it'll mass-produce

James Vincent for The Verge: The company says 100,000 pairs of Futurecraft sneakers will be made by the end of 2018

Stratasys launches new rapid prototyping Engineering-Grade 3D Printing Solution: The F123 Series

"Today there is a vast market opportunity in product prototyping that we feel is not being addressed by current 3D printing systems. The launch of the Stratasys F123 Series targets these product design workgroups, industrial designers, engineers, students and educators who demand a professional quality rapid prototyping solution that's simple to use, produces reliable, engineering-quality results, integrates perfectly within an office or lab setting, and is affordable to own and operate," said Zehavit Reisin, Vice President, Head of Rapid Prototyping Solutions, Stratasys. "As the company that invented FDM, Stratasys brings a rich pedigree to the F123 Series, providing our customers an optimal balance between usability and high performance." Full Press Release.

MIT's Foundry software is the 'Photoshop of 3D printing'

Andrew Dalton for enGadget:  Because the materials from a 3D printer aren't the most functional, their output has largely been limited to prototyping in the past. That should change in the near future with devices like MIT's own MultiFab, which can print up to 10 different materials at a time, but it still doesn't solve the problem of how to design such complex objects. That's where the new program called Foundry, created by MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory comes in. According to MIT CSAIL, Foundry can import objects designed with traditional CAD programs like SolidWorks and then assign specific materials or properties to different parts of the object. While creating a multi-material object in the past might have required days of work and multiple 3D printers to create (assuming it was possible with existing technology at all), CSAIL says these sorts of designs can now be created in mere minutes. Rather than manufacturing a separate piece for each material in the finished product, the entire object can now be printed in one fell swoop.   Cont'd...

Special Tradeshow Coverage for FABTECH

FABTECH will be held from November 16th - 18th in Las Vegas, Nevada. This ManufacturingTomorrow.com Special Tradeshow report aims to bring you news, articles and products from this years event.

This new 3D-printing pen draws with wood, copper, and bronze

James Vincent for The Verge:  3Doodler's 3D-printing pens have always had a lot of potential (who doesn't want a souped-up glue gun that can draw 3D structures in midair?), but in our hands-on with the pens, their rough build quality means they come across more as toys than serious design tools. The company's latest model, the 3Doodler Pro, wants to shake up this perception, offering professional users more control, faster-setting plastics, and a whole new range of materials to work with. Some of the new filaments on offer are pretty wild, too. 3Doodler says the Pro supports materials including wood, copper, bronze, nylon, and polycarbonate. Obviously, this doesn't mean you'll be sticking a length of dowel in the back of the Pro to draw tiny pieces of wooden furniture — instead, these new materials blend elements of their namesake into the plastic standard filament.   Cont'd...

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