Emulate3D Simulation and Emulation within the Industry 4.0 Framework

Wherever new ideas surface to bring Industry 4.0 to life, the simulation of these ideas to test, develop, and demonstrate them is the logical next step.

Welcome to the International Manufacturing Technology Show

No article can do this show justice, especially with over 2,000 exhibitors utilizing 1.3 million square feet of show floor.

New technologies reshape production lines

LINSEY MILLER & CHRISTOF WEHNER OF ARTESYN EMBEDDED TECHNOLOGIES, originally Published on Embedded Computing Design:  Whether people call it Industry 4.0, Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), or networked production, they are all talking about coming changing paradigms in the industrial network. Today there are several single-task workstations, manned by humans or robots, which are connected to a higher-level enterprise resource planning (ERP) system. However, that hierarchy is on the cusp of changing massively in the near future to accommodate newer, more intelligent technologies spanning multiple segments of the production line.   Cont'd...

Making a Splash in Water-Resistant Digital Devices

The growing trend of waterproofing portable electronic devices has led fastener manufacturers to discover a low-cost solution.

A New Effort to Teach Low-Income Students Marketable Skills

Mikahail Zinshteyn for The Atlantic:  The Obama administration is rolling out an experimental plan that will allow employers and training programs to partner with accredited universities to teach students work-related skills. This pilot will enable students to receive federal financial aid for programs that are typically ineligible for these funds, like coding boot camps. By pairing traditional universities with companies that train workers for in-demand fields like computer coding and advanced manufacturing, the U.S. Department of Education hopes to create a new model for delivering high-quality academic credentials to workers in a shorter period of time.  Cont'd...

How to prepare a business for an Industry 4.0 network

Joe Bombagi for Business Review Europe:  The first industrial revolution was based on the use of steam to power machines. The second centred on the use of electricity to supply energy to assembly lines. The third came about with the use of electronics and IT to further automate production. But all of that is in the past. We are now in the midst of the fourth industrial revolution, known as Industry 4.0, in which the Internet of Things (IoT) is set to overhaul not only business, but also every aspect of modern life. From cars, washing machines, and even clothing, to heart monitors and dams, anything and everything will soon be connected. As a result, the Industry 4.0 phenomenon is expected to revolutionise all areas within the manufacturing space, connecting all the elements that take part in the production process within the industrial environment: machines, products, systems, and people. The IoT will make today’s organisations more competitive by enabling them to further automate manufacturing processes, and collect and analyse data which they can then use to tailor their products to specific client needs.   Cont'd...

Data, Digital Threads and Industry 4.0

How software and technology are digitizing the manufacturing industry, and the benefits to business leaders.

Industry 4.0 - Interview with fabb.one Ltd

Since the factory of the future ought to be connected with its clients, we fit perfectly in this schema.

Brookings Report - America's advanced industries: New trends

Brookings Report: Â Leaders in cities, metropolitan areas, and states across the country continue to seek ways to reenergize the American economy in a way that works better for more people. To support those efforts, this report provides an update on the changing momentum and geography of America's advanced industries sector-a group of 50 R&D- and STEM (science-technology-engineering-mathematics)-worker intensive industries the vitality of which will be essential for supporting any broadly shared prosperity in U.S. regions. What emerges from the update is a mixed picture of progress and drift that registers continued momentum in the manufacturing sub-sector; a major slump in energy; and strong, widely distributed growth in high-tech services- all of which adds up to a somewhat narrowed map of growth overall. Â Cont'd.. .

Special Tradeshow Coverage for The International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS 2016)

IMTS 2016 will be held from September 12th - 17th in Chicago, Illinois. This ManufacturingTomorrow.com Special Tradeshow report aims to bring you news, articles and products from this years event.

2100 Animated Mechanical Mechanisms

Mechanical engineer Nguyen Duc Thang used Autodesk Inventor to animate different types of gears, joints, clutches, linkage and other common mechanisms. 2100 total: (Nguyen Duc Thang's youtube channel) (download of all videos)

How 3D Printing Streamlines the Engineering Workflow

Michael Molitch-Hou for Engineering.com:  The desktop 3D printing space has become an interesting one in the last year or so, as manufacturers shift the focus away from consumers and towards professional and industrial users. The technology has proven that it may not quite be ready to produce consumer goods for every household—or perhaps households aren't quite ready for 3D printing at home. Those in the industry know, however, that low-cost 3D printing is still a powerful technology, if not for fabricating home goods, then as an early design tool and, in some cases, even for short-run manufacturing.   Cont'd...

3D Printer Market Is Seen as Pillar to Revive Japan's Manufacturing Industry

The SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises), especially the parts manufacturing factories will swell with the success of the 3D printer.

Brushless DC Motors vs. Servo Motors vs. Inverters

We have put together a summary (Table 1) that compares these three technologies in a simple to understand format.

Metal additive manufacturing software 'Amphyon' uses simulations to offset printing distortions

Benedict for 3Ders.org:  German startup Additive Works is developing a simulation-based preprocessing software for metal additive manufacturing. The “Amphyon” software package, currently in beta, uses a four-step approach which enables manufacturers to predict and avoid potential deformations in their printed parts. As the metal additive manufacturing industry expands its collective wealth of knowledge and experience, users of SLM 3D printers are becoming less likely to create faulty printed parts. While a complete amateur might make the mistake of printing an unsupported or weak structure which exhibits radical contortions before it has even left the print bed, most makers now know a few things about stress points, deformations, and how to avoid bad prints. Despite these advancements, problems still persist even for the most advanced users of laser-based 3D printers. Problems such as residual stresses, deformations, and insufficient part density can occur frequently and, due to various design, material, and hardware factors, can often be hard to predict.   Cont'd...

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Featured Product

New M12 A-Coded Connectors from binder are now Ecolab and FDA certified

New M12 A-Coded Connectors from binder are now Ecolab and FDA certified

binder USA, LP, has expanded the M12 product family with the addition of the M12 A-Coded Connector, which is now certified for both Ecolab and FDA Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 21 standards. The M12 A-Coded connectors are extraordinarily durable and IP69K-rated, ideal for harsh-duty and washdown applications in the food and beverage, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. Available in 3, 4, 5, 8, and 12 contacts, the high quality stainless steel locking rings (V4A) and gold contact plating can also withstand UV exposure and shock and vibration.