The Blackbelt lets you 3D print really long items

John Biggs for TechCrunch: The Blackbelt Kickstarter will launch in three days and you can expect the system to cost about 9,500 for a desktop system or 12,500 euro for a larger system with standing supports.

Robotics, AI​​ and 3D printing could close UK's productivity gap

Angela Monaghan for The Guardian: Expanding hi-tech manufacturing is vital to the UK staying competitive, says Siemens UK boss Juergen Maier

Apple starting US tech manufacturing fund with $1 bn

MSN: Apple chief Tim Cook announced Apple is creating a fund to get more people in the US to do "advanced manufacturing," kicking it off with a billion dollars.

3D printing gets faster, with help from a vat of goo

Ben Coxworth for New Atlas: A collaboration between MIT's Self-Assembly Lab, Steelcase and product designer Christophe Guberan, however, has resulted in a new technique known as Rapid Liquid Printing - it can reduce the time of some 3D print jobs from hours to minutes.

3D-printing of glass now possible

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology via Science Daily: As a consequence of the properties of glass, such as transparency, thermal stability and resistance to acids, the use of this material in 3D-printing opens up manifold new applications in production and research, such as optics, data transmission, and biotechnology.

New 3-D printing method creates shape-shifting objects

A new 3-D printing method has been developed to create objects that can permanently transform into a range of different shapes in response to heat.

Belgian company takes 3D printing to chocolate

Jack Schofield and Waverly Colville for Reuters: Layer by layer, 0.2 millimeters at a time, a specialized printing machine at Belgian chocolate shop Miam Factory applies melted chocolate to shape a three-dimensional object.

New Research Could Help Speed Up the 3D Printing Process

Binghamton University for R&D Magazine: A team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York and MIT have identified some bottlenecks in 3D printers, that, if improved, could speed up the entire process.

Staying Rich Without Manufacturing Will Be Hard

Noah Smith for Bloomberg View: Discussions about manufacturing tend to get very contentious. Many economists and commentators believe that there's nothing inherently special about making things and that efforts to restore U.S. manufacturing to its former glory reek of industrial policy, protectionism, mercantilism and antiquated thinking.

This 3D-Printer Uses Holograms for Super-Fast Printing

Patrick Lynch for Arch Daily:  One established 3D-printing technique is using laser to cure light-activated plastic, building up layers one at a time in a time-consuming process. But now tech start-up Daqri has discovered a way of speeding up that process: by using a 3-dimensional hologram.  The printer works by projecting a 3D light field into a dish of the light sensitive monomer “goo.” The plastic quickly hardens, allowing it to be extracted using a screen. The whole process takes just 5 seconds, compared to the several minutes than would be required by an ordinary 3D printer. In addition to its increased speed, the printer also creates monocoque objects that don’t suffer from the weaknesses found in the “grain” between layers of 3-D objects. The process would also eliminate the need for supporting structures currently required to create some 3D objects.   Cont'd...

Beyond the Hype: What's Next for Industrial 3D Printing

Vicki Holt of Proto Labs via The Huffington Post:  It wasn’t long ago that 3D printing was one of the buzziest technologies around.  We watched as a 3D printer recreated a bust of Stephen Colbert on TV. We heard from industry analysts who were bullish on adoption of the technology. We imagined a future with a 3D printer in every home when major retailers began selling them online and in stores. Fast forward to today. The potential of 3D printing remains enormous. Global spend on the technology is expected to climb from $11 billion in 2015 to nearly $27 billion in 2019. But with all of the early excitement now behind us, where does 3D printing stand today? And where will it go in the future?  It can be summed up in three key developments.   Cont'd... 

CES 2017 - MarkForged 3D prints metal

From CES 2017: From the company that revolutionized 3D printing with composite carbon fiber, comes a breakthrough in metal. The Metal X greatly accelerates innovation, delivering metal parts overnight using a new technology at a fraction of the cost. Leave 20th century manufacturing in the dust and create anything from industrial replacement parts to injection molds to working prototypes.

Using 3D Printing, Lithography & Soft Robotics: New Prosthetic Hands Made for $50 at Cornell

Bridget Butler Millsaps for 3DPrint.com:  What’s so incredible about the soft robotic hand created by a team at Cornell? It can grip, sort, and sense what it is touching. But what’s truly astounding is the potential it offers in terms of price and prosthetics for the future. Bringing forth further innovation and progress to the world of robotics, at $50 one can see how it might have realistic, significant impact on numerous levels. Dispelling the idea of robots as lovable but clunky machines with a steel and rigid grip, Cornell researchers have managed to create what looks like—and offers the feel of—a human hand. This means that the task list for robots may expand exponentially as they are able to handle more delicate items, to include items like food and other fragile products. This also means that they would be able to work with people without injuring them, such as in a medical setting.   Cont'd...

A Complete Review of Semiconductor Lasers And a Few Words About What You Can Do With a 5.6 W Semiconductor Laser

This is a detailed article about popular inexpensive semiconductor lasers and about what you can engrave and cut using a 5.6 W semiconductor laser, installed on a 3D printer or CNC machine.

With 3D printers and nanofingers, HP Labs builds a new future

Stephen Shankland for CNet:  Get ready for the third chapter in the book of Silicon Valley. During the first chapter, innovation in Silicon Valley was about atoms, carving up silicon wafers into the electronic transistors that started the computing revolution. The second one, more ethereal, brought the triumph of internet services like Facebook and Google. To be competitive now, a company must blend both approaches. That's the view of HP Chief Engineer Chandrakant Patel, who rose through the HP Labs ranks over 30 years to secure 151 patents and become the company's chief engineer. "The 21st century will require Silicon Valley to be a cyber-physical valley," Patel said.   Cont'd...

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