Could Pittsburgh become the Silicon Valley of 3D Printing?

OZY.com: In Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh and Robert Morris University are at the forefront of additive technology.

How Team Penske Uses 3D Printing To Get An Edge In Racing

Alex Knapp for Forbes: That push for innovation is one reason why Team Penske signed a deal with 3D printing company Stratasys earlier this year for technical support and services.

Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) Technology

While OCT is widely utilized in other industries, its use in 3D printing is a new concept. Axsun has added OCT imaging capabilities to the printhead of industrial 3D printers to enable real-time, high-resolution scanning of each layer as it is being deposited.

What's holding back growth of 3D printing and additive manufacturing?

Jim O'Donnell for TechTarget: The era of 3D printing and additive manufacturing may be just around the corner, but the industry needs to coalesce for it to grow to scale, according to panel at Rapid + TCT conference.

The Blackbelt lets you 3D print really long items

John Biggs for TechCrunch: The Blackbelt Kickstarter will launch in three days and you can expect the system to cost about 9,500 for a desktop system or 12,500 euro for a larger system with standing supports.

Robotics, AI​​ and 3D printing could close UK's productivity gap

Angela Monaghan for The Guardian: Expanding hi-tech manufacturing is vital to the UK staying competitive, says Siemens UK boss Juergen Maier

Apple starting US tech manufacturing fund with $1 bn

MSN: Apple chief Tim Cook announced Apple is creating a fund to get more people in the US to do "advanced manufacturing," kicking it off with a billion dollars.

3D printing gets faster, with help from a vat of goo

Ben Coxworth for New Atlas: A collaboration between MIT's Self-Assembly Lab, Steelcase and product designer Christophe Guberan, however, has resulted in a new technique known as Rapid Liquid Printing - it can reduce the time of some 3D print jobs from hours to minutes.

3D-printing of glass now possible

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology via Science Daily: As a consequence of the properties of glass, such as transparency, thermal stability and resistance to acids, the use of this material in 3D-printing opens up manifold new applications in production and research, such as optics, data transmission, and biotechnology.

New 3-D printing method creates shape-shifting objects

A new 3-D printing method has been developed to create objects that can permanently transform into a range of different shapes in response to heat.

Belgian company takes 3D printing to chocolate

Jack Schofield and Waverly Colville for Reuters: Layer by layer, 0.2 millimeters at a time, a specialized printing machine at Belgian chocolate shop Miam Factory applies melted chocolate to shape a three-dimensional object.

New Research Could Help Speed Up the 3D Printing Process

Binghamton University for R&D Magazine: A team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York and MIT have identified some bottlenecks in 3D printers, that, if improved, could speed up the entire process.

Staying Rich Without Manufacturing Will Be Hard

Noah Smith for Bloomberg View: Discussions about manufacturing tend to get very contentious. Many economists and commentators believe that theres nothing inherently special about making things and that efforts to restore U.S. manufacturing to its former glory reek of industrial policy, protectionism, mercantilism and antiquated thinking.

This 3D-Printer Uses Holograms for Super-Fast Printing

Patrick Lynch for Arch Daily:  One established 3D-printing technique is using laser to cure light-activated plastic, building up layers one at a time in a time-consuming process. But now tech start-up Daqri has discovered a way of speeding up that process: by using a 3-dimensional hologram.  The printer works by projecting a 3D light field into a dish of the light sensitive monomer “goo.” The plastic quickly hardens, allowing it to be extracted using a screen. The whole process takes just 5 seconds, compared to the several minutes than would be required by an ordinary 3D printer. In addition to its increased speed, the printer also creates monocoque objects that don’t suffer from the weaknesses found in the “grain” between layers of 3-D objects. The process would also eliminate the need for supporting structures currently required to create some 3D objects.   Cont'd...

Beyond the Hype: What's Next for Industrial 3D Printing

Vicki Holt of Proto Labs via The Huffington Post:  It wasn’t long ago that 3D printing was one of the buzziest technologies around.  We watched as a 3D printer recreated a bust of Stephen Colbert on TV. We heard from industry analysts who were bullish on adoption of the technology. We imagined a future with a 3D printer in every home when major retailers began selling them online and in stores. Fast forward to today. The potential of 3D printing remains enormous. Global spend on the technology is expected to climb from $11 billion in 2015 to nearly $27 billion in 2019. But with all of the early excitement now behind us, where does 3D printing stand today? And where will it go in the future?  It can be summed up in three key developments.   Cont'd... 

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