GE Launches Brilliant Skills Curriculum to Train Workers for Digital Industrial Future

GE announced today a proprietary skills curriculum to train global supply chain employees for new, highly valuable jobs needed in our digital industrial economy. This new initiative will focus on lean, advanced, additive and digital manufacturing. Built on GE's Brilliant Factory strategy, which uses big data, software, sensors, controllers and robotics to increase productivity, 'Brilliant Learning' is designed for GE's global supply chain employees but will also be available to all employees, in multiple languages across all levels of manufacturing roles.

Abu Dhabi, Dubai Partner with GE for Region's 1st Microfactories

Paul Ebeling for Live Trading News: "These Microfactories are a glimpse of what the future represents, combining innovation and educational ecosystems with fast, efficient and sustainable manufacturing capabilities. The possibilities are truly limitless," said HE Mohamed Abdullah Al Gergawi, UAE minister of cabinet affairs and MD of Dubai Future Foundation.

A3 to Kick Off Automate 2017 with White Paper on Jobs in the Automation Age

The white paper explores the impact of automation on the ever-evolving job market and the growing shortage of skilled employees with experience and training in advanced technologies. A3 examines the types of jobs that are going unfilled and reviews workforce development initiatives, including education, apprenticeships, and on-the-job training that will fill labor shortages and support ongoing economic growth and productivity.

Staying Rich Without Manufacturing Will Be Hard

Noah Smith for Bloomberg View: Discussions about manufacturing tend to get very contentious. Many economists and commentators believe that there's nothing inherently special about making things and that efforts to restore U.S. manufacturing to its former glory reek of industrial policy, protectionism, mercantilism and antiquated thinking.

Mnuchin on robots taking US jobs: 'It's not even on our radar screen ... 50-100 more years' away

David Reid for CNBC: U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said he was not worried about the mass displacement of U.S. workers by robots and could be a century before a labor crisis eventuates. "It's not even on our radar screen ... 50-100 more years," Mnuchin said.

3D Printing: Still Worth It?

From Motif Investing: Some analysts believe HP's inroads into the 3D printing space made buyers more hesitant to purchase 3D printers in order to see how the technology evolves. While HP will get far more revenue from sales of its traditional 2D printers and PCs, it could become a major player in the 3D printing world in the near future.

Gartner muses on importance of algorithms for Industry 4.0 projects

IoT Tech News: Algorithms are vital for Industry 4.0, and as Thomas Oestreich, managing vice president at research company Gartner puts it: "…the connected world of cyber-physical systems has to deal with the sheer volume, real-time velocity and diversity of data; and in order to drive new value and differentiating innovations, new algorithms need to be developed. This is making algorithms the pulse of Industry 4.0 initiatives."

Industry 4.0: The Five Steps Towards A Digital Supply Chain

Forbes: The key for a successful digital transformation of the existing supply chain, and therewith reaping the full benefits of DSC, lies in developing an orderly process for implementing and integrating the many technologies and capabilities required.

MakerBot says its new print process reduces times and costs by around 30 percent

Brian Heater for TechCrunch: MakerBot's MinFill arrived quietly last night as a firmware upgrade for existing customers, and the company is already calling it a "big benchmark in speed and widespread adoption of 3D printing."

Japan looks beyond Industry 4.0 towards Society 5.0

Techworld from IDG: At the Cebit trade show in Germany, Japanese businesses want to go beyond smart factories, deploying industrial technologies to build a smart society

Carbon SpeedCell™: Additive Manufacturing Reinvented

Carbon the Silicon Valley-based additive manufacturing company, today announced the launch of SpeedCell, a system of securely connected products designed to upend traditional methods of manufacturing. The first components of the SpeedCell include two new products that provide a powerful solution for additive manufacturing at scale: The M2, a robust, industrial-grade 3D printer built with manufacturers in mind; and the Smart Part Washer that enables optimal cleaning and easy finishing of parts.  Carbon's Continuous Liquid Interface Production (CLIP) technology coupled with the SpeedCell system enables previously impossible designs, from single-part combinations of complex assemblies to un-moldable and un-millable geometries like lattices, while also minimizing the tooling and prototyping stages of the design process to go directly to end-use part production. Manufacturers can now cost-effectively and quickly introduce new products, produce localized products for specific markets, provide inventory on-demand, and explore a breadth of other business models.   Full Press Release:

Texprocess to present Digital Textile Micro Factory for the first time

Innovation in Textiles: At the upcoming Texprocess trade fair, which will take place in Frankfurt, in May, a Digital Textile Micro Factory will present a live demonstration of an integrated production chain for apparel. In collaboration with the German Institutes for Textile and Fibre Research in Denkendorf and a number of well-known companies in the textile sector, Texprocess will demonstrate the entire networked production of items of clothing - from the design stage to digital printing, automatic cutting out and fabrication. Visitors at Texprocess will follow a signposted path through the various individual stages of manufacture in the micro factory and will be able to get information from experts at each stage. In addition, there will also be guided tours on offer. Cont'd...

World's first 3D-printed skyscraper to be built in UAE

The Express Tribune:  A Dubai-based construction firm Cazza has announced its plans to build the world’ first 3D-printed skyscraper.  According to the company, the skyscraper will be built in the United Arab Emirates. Cazza uses a 3D printing construction system that combines mobile 3D printing robots with existing construction methods to make construction processes faster and cost-effective. In order to construct the high-rise building, the company will use the ‘crane printing’ technique The firm will be able to 3D print high rises using a new construction technique called ‘crane printing’. For the process, the company will use cranes with added units designed to build 3D structures of 80m and above. While the cranes will 3D print specific parts of the building, the rest of the construction will be carried out via existing methods.   Cont'd...

Infineon invests S$105 million in Smart Factory

Calvin Hui for Channel News Asia:  German semiconductor Infineon Technologies will invest S$105 million over the next five years into building a Smart Factory at its Singapore manufacturing facility. This is part of Infineon’s push to implement what it calls a Smart Enterprise Programme, encompassing horizontal, vertical and digital integration. For instance, it has introduced robots like automated guided vehicles, to facilitate the transportation of chips across different parts of the facility. Senior engineer Foo Say Wee, said: “For the lots delivery, it used to be carried out manually by the operator who has to search the lots and carry the lot and hand it to the equipment. But today, employing automation, the lot will be automatically delivered to the operator and after that we have robotic vehicles that automatically come over and transport the lots to the equipment." The company manufactures chips used in things like cars and electronic identification such as passports.   Cont'd...

Grocery 4.0: Ocado reshapes retail with robotics and automation

Jon Excell for The Engineer:  Online grocer Ocado is establishing a reputation as a major technology player. Jon Excell reports If prompted to name a UK company at the cutting edge of robotics and automation, few of us would cite one of the country’s best-known grocery retailers. But, as The Engineer learned on a recent visit to one of its key facilities, online supermarket Ocado is establishing a reputation as a major technology player: harnessing and developing machine-learning systems, Internet of Things concepts and robotic hardware to a degree that leaves many traditional engineering businesses in the shade.   Full Article:

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