Here's What Life Will Be Like With 3D Printers That Can Create Anything

Kristin Houser for Futurism: Today's desktop 3D printers are fairly limited in terms of capabilities. However, we could be just a couple of decades away from a world in which every home has a 3D printer, capable of producing almost anything we can imagine.

Novel 3D printing technique yields high-performance composites

Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences: Given the modular nature of their ink designs, many different filler and matrix combinations can be implemented to tailor electrical, optical, or thermal properties of the printed objects.

How to invest in 3D printing

Iona Bain for IG: D printing has been called the 'third industrial revolution' and it has a market that's expected to be worth $35 billion in 2020. That doesn't make 3D printing an easy target for investors. Here's our guide to investing in the sector.

Why Siemens, GE and Rolls-Royce are turning to 3D printing

Sara Murphy for GreenBiz: 3D printing techniques, however, could be almost universally preferable, if industry steers in the right direction. And clear pathways exist for maximizing the technology's green potential.

Carnegie Mellon University Extends Research into 3D Micro-Additive Manufacturing with Optomec Aerosol Jet Printed Electronics System

Developing novel methods to create next generation manufacturing processes for sensors, antennas and energy harvesting devices

This Device Is Trying To Revolutionize 3D Printing

Dave Pinter for PSFK: The process works with the robot arm dispensing a stream of silicone into a tank of clear gel, the consistence of which isn't too far off from hair gel. The technique allows for object with internal volumes to be printed without extra internal support.

HP unveils S$100m campus, home to its first advanced manufacturing centre

Jacquelyn Cheok for Business Times: Smarc, a 6,000 sq ft facility, allows engineers to design, experiment and implement solutions to improve HP's manufacturing processes. The target is to boost productivity by at least 20 per cent.

Samsung announces R&D partnership with Clemson, USC to promote advanced manufacturing

Andrew Moore for Upstate Business Journal: The new partnership includes a program that aims to develop better manufacturing techniques for home appliances, foster public-private collaboration, and encourage more students to pursue advanced manufacturing as a career.

NVBots Sold to Ohio Manufacturer as 3D Printing Interest Grows

Jeff Engel for Xconomy: NVBots was founded by MIT students who were frustrated that the 3D printers they were using lacked capabilities for remotely collaborating on the design of parts and for controlling the printer.

New design gives 3D printers a 10x speed boost

Rich Haridy for New Atlas: What previously took over an hour to print could now be created in just minutes thanks to a new 3D printer design from engineers at MIT

VTT: Five percent of spare parts could currently be stored in digital warehouses.

VTT Research: This would make parts more quickly and easily available, while creating considerable cost savings. Digitalisation will also enable individual customisation and an increase in the intelligence of parts.

Can US Boost Manufacturing 25% By 2025?

Industry Week: A new McKinsey report predicts that manufacturing GDP would climb to $3 trillion in real terms by 2025-a boost of some $530 billion, or 20%, above the current trend.

3D Printer Farms And Robotics Start Pointing To Future Of Manufacturing

TJ McCue for Forbes: Many relatively small companies are providing printers and software for these new 3D print clusters, or farms, as many call them.

3D Systems outlines additive manufacturing strategy, aims for turnaround

Larry Dignan for ZDNet: 3D Systems rolled out a series of systems, software and services aimed at targeting industries. Going vertical is key to the company's turnaround hopes.

3D printing doubles the strength of stainless steel

Robert F. Service for ScienceMag: Now, researchers have come up with a way to 3D print tough and flexible stainless steel, an advance that could lead to faster and cheaper ways to make everything from rocket engines to parts for nuclear reactors and oil rigs.

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