SME Survey Results Show Parental Misconceptions of Manufacturing Careers

The results show that parents do not necessarily have the most up-to-date information or perspective on manufacturing and the opportunities available.

DEARBORN, Mich., April 27, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- SME, an organization that serves the manufacturing industry by promoting advanced manufacturing technology and developing a skilled workforce, has released results from a national survey of parents on their views related to careers in manufacturing.


The results show that parents do not necessarily have the most up-to-date information or perspective on manufacturing and the opportunities available.

"The landscape in advanced manufacturing has evolved," said Jeffrey Krause, CEO of SME. "A serious misconception is that manufacturing is dirty, dark or dangerous; and isn't seen as an optimal career choice. The reality is far from that."

"Manufacturing today is an advanced, high-value industry that represents innovation and technology. The survey results demonstrate that we need to show that manufacturing careers can be exciting, stimulating and very rewarding."

Survey says
SME surveyed parents nationwide to assess their views on manufacturing as a career. Some findings include:

More than 20 percent of parents surveyed view manufacturing as an outdated and/or dirty work environment.
Half of all respondents do not see manufacturing as an exciting, challenging or engaging profession.
Nearly one-quarter of parents surveyed do not feel that manufacturing is a well-paying profession.
Dispelling the myths

Many of today's manufacturing environments look more like clean rooms, with laboratory-like settings.
Manufacturing offers career opportunities for every education level ranging from skilled trades that require a high school diploma or GED to engineers, designers and programmers with bachelor's and master's degrees and researchers and scientists with PhDs.
Technological advancements are yielding well-paying careers - the average U.S. manufacturing worker makes $77,506.
The use of 3D design and computer-aided engineering software is attracting students interested in non-traditional careers such as game design and animatronics.
Other industry truths

Many advances are taking place in additive manufacturing. That includes 3D printing, which has been used to create everything from aircraft parts to custom medical devices. The global 3D printing market is expected to grow from $1.6 billion in 2015 to $13.4 billion in 2018.
For every $1 spent in manufacturing, another $1.37 is added to the economy - the highest multiplier effect of any economic sector.
An estimated 3.5 million manufacturing jobs will become available in the next 10 years - but without the right skilled workers for the jobs, an estimated 2 million of those jobs could go unfulfilled.
More survey results can be provided by contacting communications@sme.org.

About SME
SME connects all those who are passionate about making things that improve our world. As a nonprofit organization, SME has served practitioners, companies, educators, government and communities across the manufacturing spectrum for more than 80 years. Through its strategic areas of events, media, membership, training and development, and the SME Education Foundation, SME is uniquely dedicated to the advancement of manufacturing by addressing both knowledge and skills needed for the industry. Follow @SME_MFG on Twitter or facebook.com/SMEmfg.

Featured Product

FASTSUITE - Focus on efficiency in Digital Factory

FASTSUITE - Focus on efficiency in Digital Factory

With two product lines, FASTSUITE for V5, which is seamlessly integrated with CATIA/DELMIA V5, and FASTSUITE Edition 2, a standalone platform, the areas of OLP (offline programming), manufacturing simulation and virtual commissioning are the core of our business activities. Our applications and solutions are not only focused on real customer needs, but they are also designed to improve efficiency and quality of our customers' manufacturing processes. No matter if the process is just about offline programming of a single robot at a small job-shop company or about the validation of a complete production line at an Automotive or Aerospace OEM. We strive to ensure a constant quality of our services and to provide the best possible support to our worldwide customers. Therefore we have established three digital manufacturing hubs around the world. All our teams have a proven expertise on manufacturing process integration and profound IT implementation skills.