What are the business and security impacts of Industry 4.0?

Ben Rossi for Information Age:  Industry 4.0 will make manufacturing more efficient and productive. By optimising factories, it will directly improve yield. On the product side, it will also extract greater value from data for usage-based design and mass customisation, which in turn will open the way to new markets. On many levels, it will completely change the business model to an outcome-based approach. Accenture estimates that automation, connectivity and embedded software can increase production line productivity by up to 30%. The shift from selling products to selling measurable outcomes will redefine whole industry structures. This is the shift to servitisation, whereby companies are using the Internet of Things (IoT) to find new ways to grow revenue and increase profits. Industrial equipment manufacturers sell outcomes, like machine hours or price-per-user, rather than just products. For the customer it means less disruption, increased uptime, incremented factory yield and ultimately higher satisfaction.   Cont'd...

One-Stop Repair for Food & Beverage Processing Equipment

Food and beverage processors speed repairs and reduce costs by working with single source for full gamut of machine repairs, from electronic controllers to motors.

Hannover Fairs Canada and SME Form Partnership to Co-Locate Five Industrial Technology Events with Canadian Manufacturing Technology Show 2017

CMTS is a biennial manufacturing event that will draw more than 9,000 attendees to connect with more than 700 exhibiting companies represented. The event showcases the latest advancements in machine tools, tooling, metal forming and fabricating and advanced manufacturing applications.

IEEE Standards Association, AIOTI, oneM2M and W3C Collaborate on Joint White Paper Covering Semantic Interoperability for the Internet of Things (IoT)

Organizations working together for consensus building to drive development and standardization for accelerated IoT market growth

Japan's Rust Belt Counting on Robonomics to Run Assembly Lines

Yoshiaki Nohara, Toru Fujioka, and Daniel Moss for Bloomberg:   A withering factory town in Japan’s Rust Belt is looking for revival through a dose of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s "robot revolution." Kadoma’s population has declined 13 percent as the nation ages, prompting mergers among elementary schools and emergency services departments. Factories can’t find enough people to run assembly lines, further threatening an industrial base that includes titan Panasonic Corp. and smaller businesses like Izumo Co., a maker of industrial rubber. Yet Izumo President Tsutomu Otsubo doesn’t believe the solution involves finding more people. He’d rather find more machines to do the work so his company can capitalize on Abe’s plan to quadruple Japan’s robotics sector into a 2.4 trillion yen ($20 billion) industry by 2020.   Cont'd...

OEMs Consider Cross-Border Move in Face of Uncertainty

Border towns, such as El Paso, Texas, could service as "middle ground" if OEMs with operations in Mexico decide to relocate stateside.

New TechCast AI Study Forecasts 20 Percent Job Loss by 2030, But Offset by New Opportunities

TechCast Global, Inc., an innovative trend forecasting company, has released a new study addressing the looming issue of unemployment as artificial intelligence (AI) takes over entire fields of work.

A3 Kicks off 2017 with Business Forum and Record Industry Results

World's leading annual networking event attracts 525+ global automation leaders

A New Use for High-Speed Fiber Optics: Connecting Smart Factories

Jennifer Baljko for EBN Online:  Machine-to-machine (M2M) connectivity and the Internet of Things (IoT) have risen to the forefront of many strategic technology conversations. Companies are revamping product designs and component capabilities to allow for seamless, real-time communication flows between devices. Executives talk about how constant transmission and automated analysis of machine-generated information will transform the way we live, work, play, drive and shop, and change the landscape of our homes, offices, cars, malls, supermarkets, hospitals, gas stations and every other place we move through on a daily basis. As M2M and IoT shape business and operations strategies, influence product design and compel companies to re-examine how suppler and customer data is collected and used, a question begs: How will companies pool together all their internal factory and supply chain data in a way that matches the speed, consistency and reliability of what IoT promises? The factory, after all, is the heartbeat that keeps many companies operating, and a data bottleneck there comes with a costly implication. Many in the industry in have started to realize that, and it's resulting in a deeper conversation around industrial IoT, or IIoT.   Cont'd...

New Kyntronics Linear and Rotary Actuators with Multi-axis Coordinated Motion for OEMs

Kyntronics' new electromechanical actuators are precision motion control devices for force requirements up to 1,000 lbf (4500N) for linear applications or 2,400 in-lbs (270Nm) for rotary applications. Setup is simple with fully integrated electronics.

Intel Forecasts 2017 Industrial IoT Trends

Intel's Antony Neal-Graves has shared his initial thoughts on how the industrial landscape will evolve in 2017.

New, Affordable USB3.0 SWIR OEM Linescan Camera for Machine Vision & Spectroscopy

• Princeton Infrared's affordable OEM SWIR/visible linescan camera will premiere at SPIE's Photonics West, Moscone Convention Center, Jan. 29 - Feb. 2, 2017 in booth #312.

EtherCAT Soft Motion Control Auto-Configuration

Configuring servo motors and drives through network control software can be cumbersome and time-consuming

Energy Department Announces Universities to Lead Industrial Assessment Centers Program

New funding opportunities will bring this manufacturing training program to underserved areas, expand technical assistance



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Automation & Networking - Featured Product

Stäubli TX2-60 Industrial Robot

Stäubli TX2-60 Industrial Robot

TX2 robots: redefining performance by offering collaborative safety and high performance in a single machine. These pioneering robots can be used in all areas, including sensitive and restrictive environments, thanks to their unique features. Safety functions are easy and inexpensive to implement. They allow a higher level of interactions between robots and human operators, while still guaranteeing protection of your people, production and investment.