Here is a list of white papers. Please let us know if there is a white paper you would like to see that's not on the list. Just send us an email containing details about the white paper including Name, Publication Date, Contact Telephone, Email and URL if available.


Featured Additive & 3D Printing White Papers

MARKFORGED: BUYER'S GUIDE TO 3D PRINTING FOR MANUFACTURING
Published by Markforged

All Additive & 3D Printing White Papers

A COLLECTION OF POWDER CHARACTERIZATION STANDARDS FOR METAL ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

A Collection of Powder Characterization Standards for Metal Additive Manufacturing contains nine existing MPIF Standard Test Methods can be applicable for the characterization of powders used in metal additive manufacturing (AM) processes, with an explanation of each standard. These standards, intended to present and clarify PM technology as an aid in conducting business, relate to those activities that concern designers, manufacturers, and users of metal AM parts.

MARKFORGED: BUYER'S GUIDE TO 3D PRINTING FOR MANUFACTURING

3D printing has become a powerful force in today’s manufacturing industry from prototyping to tooling and fixtures to custom, end-use parts. Many businesses struggle to find the right solutions to fit their needs and provide ROI. Selecting the right platform to prevent manufacturing roadblocks is vital to optimizing your manufacturing line productivity. Download the all new buyer's guide to help you evaluate the benefits of 3D printing and dispel misconceptions, understand the pros/cons of various 3D printing processes and materials, and assess the key considerations in selecting a 3D printer.

THE IMPORTANCE OF PROCESS VALIDATION IN ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

This paper explains the importance of achieving a process validation for AM, the process by which Precision ADM used to do so, the results of various tensile and density tests, as well as showing the complexities and hurdles that need to be overcome.

BENEFITS OF ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING FOR CUSTOMIZED MEDICAL IMPLANTS

The white paper explores the results of kinematic validation simulation testing on the implant done by the Orthopaedic Innovation Centre. The testing reveals that utilizing additive manufacturing and key post-processing operations on this customized knee implant resulted in samples that exceeded expectations

GUIDE TO SLS & MJF AUTOMATED POWDER REMOVAL WITH INNOVATIVE FUSILLADE TECHNOLOGY

As 3D printed powder-bed technologies such as SLS and MJF rise in popularity, their users stumble upon a common problem – post-processing. After excess powder is initially brushed away (as seen in the picture at left), the build tray is caked in unusable powder. Current methods of removal such as manual bead blasting and vibratory machines leave much to be desired with regards to their labor requirements, damage rates, and inconsistent results in removing powder from fine cavities.

KEY CONSIDERATIONS FOR METAL AM PARAMETER OPTIMIZATION

The term “optimize process parameters for additive” is commonly used in the additive manufacturing (AM) world. But what does it really mean to optimize parameters for metal additive manufacturing? Bringing a 3D-printed part to market involves identifying the correct material source, characterizing the raw material, identifying the correct machine parameter window for deposition, developing the stress relief and heat treatment parameters, identifying the correct post finishing technique and, finally, determining the right NDE technique for inspection. All of this involves optimization to determine the ideal parameter sets based on functional part requirements.

LARGE TITANIUM SPACECRAFT VALVE BODY PRINTED IN SINGLE PROCESS

Titanium is often used in aerospace and aircraft applications due to its strength and light weight, however it is known to be difficult to machine. Metal 3D printing continues to make headway as advancements in Selective Laser Melting technology allow for larger components to be built out of metal powder in a laser powder bed over a period of days, eliminating the need for conventional machine setup and tooling. The resulting build provided the customer with a part offering both cost and time savings while reducing weight.

TRANSFORMING FDM SUPPORT REMOVAL WITH VOLUMETRIC VELOCITY DISPERSION AUTOMATION TECHNOLOGY

Learn how your throughput may be limited with traditional submersion support removal systems. This white paper will review why current “default” mechanical and chemical post-print methods for FDM are inadequate along with details of the revolutionary Volumetric Velocity Dispersion (VVD) automation technology. See how VVD utilizes different forms of mechanical energy to increase FDM support removal efficiency, reduce drying time, and mitigate the risk of damaged parts.

MWES 3D ADDITIVE SYSTEM: ADDERE INNOVATIVE 3D METAL PRINTING

MWES’ proprietary process of 3D Metal printing of exotic materials is demanded due to expensive manufacturing methods involving casting or machining out of stock material. Download our free Whitepaper to learn the Layer-by-Layer Process to Successful Additive Manufacturing!

BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN DESIGN & MANUFACTURING A GUIDE TO PROCESS DEVELOPMENT

As engineers, we are always challenged to bridge the gap between design and manufacturing in the most effective way. As manufacturers, you produce new parts from a prototype design, but also struggle to select the best process for long-term production. Download our Guide to Process Development where we share with you how to successfully launch a new product or optimize an existing process!

HOW SMART CHEMISTRY FOR 3D PRINTED PARTS OPTIMIZES SUPPORT REMOVAL FOR POLYJET TECHNOLOGY

Learn about traditional methods vs. new technologies that intelligently leverage chemical solutions along with mechanical energy to achieve efficiencies in PolyJet post-printing. Discover pros and cons of common chemical-based solutions for 3D post-print support removal as well as considerations for implementing existing and new technology approaches in terms of safety and performance. This white paper includes case study data demonstrating advantages in cycle time, cycle efficiency, and operator attendance time for new “smart” applications of chemical treatment with mechanical energy