MIT's Foundry software is the 'Photoshop of 3D printing'

Andrew Dalton for enGadget:  Because the materials from a 3D printer aren't the most functional, their output has largely been limited to prototyping in the past. That should change in the near future with devices like MIT's own MultiFab, which can print up to 10 different materials at a time, but it still doesn't solve the problem of how to design such complex objects. That's where the new program called Foundry, created by MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory comes in.

According to MIT CSAIL, Foundry can import objects designed with traditional CAD programs like SolidWorks and then assign specific materials or properties to different parts of the object. While creating a multi-material object in the past might have required days of work and multiple 3D printers to create (assuming it was possible with existing technology at all), CSAIL says these sorts of designs can now be created in mere minutes. Rather than manufacturing a separate piece for each material in the finished product, the entire object can now be printed in one fell swoop.  Cont'd...

Comments (0)

This post does not have any comments. Be the first to leave a comment below.


Post A Comment

You must be logged in before you can post a comment. Login now.

Featured Product

WIND RIVER LEADS THE WAY IN SAFETY SOLUTIONS FOR CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE.

WIND RIVER LEADS THE WAY IN SAFETY SOLUTIONS FOR CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE.

When it comes to ensuring the development of can't-fail systems, Wind River® is a leader with a proven track record of success. With more than 30 years of experience in embedded software and a portfolio of products deployed across more than 2 billion devices, Wind River delivers safety and security when it counts most. From industrial automation to automotive systems, as well as in healthcare devices, railway operations, and throughout the aerospace and defense sector, Wind River has extensive expertise providing built-in safety for complex, connected, safety-critical systems.