3-D-printed robots with shock-absorbing skins

Adam Conner-Simons for MIT News:  Anyone who’s watched drone videos or an episode of “BattleBots” knows that robots can break — and often it’s because they don’t have the proper padding to protect themselves.

But this week researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory(CSAIL) will present a new method for 3-D printing soft materials that make robots safer and more precise in their movements — and that could be used to improve the durability of drones, phones, shoes, helmets, and more.

The team’s “programmable viscoelastic material” (PVM) technique allows users to program every single part of a 3D-printed object to the exact levels of stiffness and elasticity they want, depending on the task they need for it.  Cont'd...

Comments (0)

This post does not have any comments. Be the first to leave a comment below.


Post A Comment

You must be logged in before you can post a comment. Login now.

Featured Product

PI USA - If it can be MEASURED, we can OPTIMIZE it

PI USA - If it can be MEASURED, we can OPTIMIZE it

Alignment of opto-mechanical components, tracking, laser or camera performance optimization - when the performance or quality can be measured as a quantity, PI can help you achieve more, faster. PI engineers have helped customers in industries such as optics, bio-technology, imaging, life sciences, photonics, aerospace, and semiconductor production. If you work on a project that can benefit from higher precision and/or higher speed fine tuning, you'll be happy to have talked to our engineers.