Has IIoT Become the Norm Across All Industrial Sectors? Industry Experts Say

Larry Turner for Industry Week: Industry experts agree, it makes sense to start now and to make small steps towards the big idea of IIoT. Partnerships can help the process.

Small Town America's Newest Product: Advanced Manufacturing

Harold L. (Hal) Sirkin for Forbes: People with skills and talent typically gravitate to "superstar cities," such as New York and Los Angeles, or to "knowledge and tech hubs" like Boston, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington, D.C., not to small towns in the South.

Defending 3D Printers From Hackers

Charles Q. Choi for IEEE Spectrum: Researchers reveal three methods of verifying that 3d-printed parts have not been compromised by someone hacking the printer itself.

Space-Based 3-D Printing Reaches Milestone

Mike Wall, SPACE.com: A 3D printer built by the California-based company Made in Space churned out multiple polymer-alloy objects - the largest of which was a 33.5-inch-long (85 centimeters) beam - during a 24-day test inside a thermal vacuum chamber (TVAC) here in Silicon Valley at NASA's Ames Research Center in June.

Foxconn's Wisconsin plan raises skepticism as well as hope

Rick Barrett, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: The magnitude of Foxconn Technology Group's proposal for a $10 billion electronics factory in southeast Wisconsin is matched by the gravity of the questions it has raised

Voodoo Automates 3D Printing to Take on Injection Molding

Michael Molitch-Hou for Engineering.com: With Project Skywalker, Voodoo Manufacturing was able to automate an important part of its manufacturing process.

Toward additive manufacturing

Phys.org: Although additive manufacturing has been around since the 1980s, the technology has advanced rapidly over the past few years.

100x faster, 10x cheaper: 3D metal printing is about to go mainstream

Loz Blain for New Atlas: Desktop Metal's Studio System includes a fully-automated, office-friendly sintering furnace with fast cycle times and a peak temperature of 1400°C, allowing for the sintering of a wide variety of materials

How GE Appliances Built an Innovation Lab to Rapidly Prototype Products

Harvard Business Review: Midway through 2014, GE Appliances launched FirstBuild - a GE-equipped innovation lab and micro-factory - to augment the strengths of a long-established company with those of an entrepreneurial startup. Separation is the key.

Smart Factories Will Deliver $500B In Value By 2022

Louis Columbus for Forbes: Smart factories are revolutionizing manufacturing by enabling a 7X increase in overall productivity by 2022.

The US Navy 3D printed a concept submersible in four weeks

Andrew Liptak for The Verge: The team began work in August 2016, and used a massive industrial 3D Pinter called Big Area Additive Manufacturing (BAAM) to manufacture six carbon fiber sections, which were then assembled into the 30 foot long vehicle.

Japanese companies form alliance to accelerate smart factories

Freddie Roberts for Internet of Business: A group of companies in Japan have formed the Flexible Factory Partner Alliance (FFPA) in order to encourage the use of IoT in factories.

New 3D Printing Technique Significantly Strengthens Materials

Kenny Walter for R&D Magazine: Researchers from Texas A&M University have strengthened 3D printed parts by applying traditional welding concepts to bond the submillimeter layers in a 3D printed part together.

AFRL researchers explore automation, additive technologies for cost efficient solar power

Phys.org: Solar cells can generate electricity in an environmentally friendly way, but current, complex fabrication costs make the technology expensive.

Cermaq near to completing "smart" factory for salmon

Madelyn Kearns for Seafood Source: "A modern salmon facility takes in the fish, evaluates quality, weight, grading, and during all processes automatically determines which department the fish should go to,"

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