Volvo Construction Equipment Digs Up Prototype Savings Of 18 Weeks And 92% Of Costs

Since 3D printing the prototype cost $770 and took only two weeks, including both design and development, VCE completed its testing much sooner than traditional methods would have allowed.

NVBOTS Launches NVLABS: The R&D Solution for Any Company in Need of Ultra-High Speed, Multi-Metal 3D Printing Capabilities; Appoints Dr. Paul Burke as Chief Research Officer

Customers to Benefit from Growing List of Supported Metals, Including Stainless Steel, Titanium, Nickel, Copper Nickel, Aluminum, Zirconium, Silver and Palladium

Thoughts turn to revolution in Davos

By Matthew Allen for SWI:  Intelligent robots and drones, 3D printers, self-driving vehicles, data mountains, smart production lines, fintech and blockchain – the fourth industrial revolution is here. The World Economic Forum’s (WEF) annual Davos meeting will ponder the potential, limitations and societal impacts of “Industry 4.0”. Will the transformation of the workplace create jobs or unemployment? Will it close the gap between industrialised and developing economies, rich and poor - or widen it? For Swiss firms, can the new technological revolution ease the pressures of the strong franc? Speaking ahead of the annual meeting in Davos, WEF founder Klaus Schwab called on world leaders to revise policies to accommodate the coming changes. “We are not yet sufficiently prepared for this fourth industrial revolution that will come over us like a tsunami and will change whole systems,” he said. “My fear is that if we are not prepared we will create a world where particularly the middle class is frozen out. That would lead to a new problem of social exclusion that we absolutely have to avoid.”  Cont'd...

Fuel3D deploys new 3D algorithm to boost performance

Software release includes new 'Cat Bird' algorithm to advance Z-axis precision and integrates cloud services for processing 3D scan data

3D-Printing Milestone: Puris 3D Prints Largest Titanium Part

Puris, LLC (www.purisllc.com) announced today that it recently achieved a major 3D-printing milestone: Puris successfully produced the largest, complex, 3D-printed titanium part for commercial use.

Newest Science Center Incubator Startups Addressing a Variety of Healthcare and Technology Needs

From 3D printing to medical imaging software, the newest residents of the University City Science Center's Port business incubator are developing the next generation of healthcare and technology solutions.

New Ultrasonic 3D Printing Process Can Create and Print High-Tech Composite Materials

Scott J Grunewald for 3DPrint.com:  A team of engineers from the University of Bristol — comprising Thomas M. Llewellyn-Jones, Bruce W. Drinkwater and Richard S. Trask — have developed a new hybrid type of 3D printing that can both assemble and print with composite materials using a combination of desktop 3D printer technology, light-curable resins and ultrasonic waves. This new process can allow super strong and lightweight composites like the variety used to produce tennis rackets, golf clubs, professional bicycles or even airplane parts to be used with additive manufacturing technology. Needless to say these new material options will offer entire new industries the ability to incorporate 3D printing into their manufacturing workflow. And the best part is that for the most part the process was made using existing 3D printing technology. Composite materials are made by combining micro-structures of glass or carbon fibers with a plastic material. The carefully arranged fibers lock together and give the new material its strength and durability, while the plastic ensures that the resulting material will be lightweight. Currently, composite materials are manufactured as thin sheets that are then layered and cut into the desired shape and thickness. The problem with using this as a 3D printing material is the small fibers in the composite materials. In order to produce the desired strength the fibers need to be aligned in a very precise structure, which is currently not possible to reproduce using a 3D printer.   Cont'd.. .

Liquidmetal Technologies and ENGEL Host Advanced Manufacturing Symposium in Stuttgart

Liquidmetal® Technologies, Inc. (OTCQB: LQMT), the world's leading developer of amorphous alloys, announced today that it would be co-hosting an advanced manufacturing symposium in Stuttgart, Germany, on January 19-20, to inform product developers, production managers and managing directors in the metal and plastics processing industries about the advanced capabilities currently available and in use by Liquidmetal Technologies at its Manufacturing Center of Excellence.

CHGT to Develop 3D Printing Educational Program for Schools and Colleges

With an eye towards potential future customers, Changing Technologies, Inc. (OTCQB: CHGT) is considering putting together a 3D printing/additive manufacturing educational course for area schools.

French Develops New Composite Molding Hydraulic Press for Aerospace Components

French Oil Mill Machinery Company recently developed a hydraulic press system to improve the part quality of critical composite aerospace components while dramatically reducing production cost, energy consumption and noise emissions. The downacting, sideplate hydraulic press system is designed with an Integrated RTM Package, a Precision Control Motion Package, specialized Uni-Temp platens for advanced temperature control, and the Edge II Control System, a specialized recipe and data collection system programmed to monitor critical processing data, insuring consistent results.

U.S. Cutting Tool YTD Consumption Down 4.1% in November

November U.S. cutting tool consumption totaled $153.7 million, according to the U.S. Cutting Tool Institute (USCTI) and AMT - The Association For Manufacturing Technology.

Optomec Partners with Dragonfly to Expand Additive Manufacturing Market in Italy

Dragonfly to Distribute Optomec LENS Systems for 3D Printed Metals and Aerosol Jet Systems for 3D Printed Electronics

ATX West - MD&M West Presents an In-Depth Look at New Medtech Innovations - from Nanorobots to 3D-Printed Knees

Largest Medical Design and Manufacturing Event in the World Hosts Expert Talks, Including Panel of Leading Physicians Discussing Emerging Medical Technologies

For Advanced Manufacturing, Success Demands Innovation, Education and Public-Private Partnership

MICHAEL D. WHEELER for Photonics.com:  Global manufacturing has undergone enormous changes in the past decade as many developing countries have joined the club of tier-one manufacturing nations, a recession stalled demand, and employment fell precipitously in leading economies. Yet manufacturing remains critical to the future of both developing and advanced worlds, driving innovation, productivity and competitiveness, and offering a pathway out of poverty. Recent attention has focused on “advanced manufacturing,” which replaces traditional labor-intensive processes with ones based on the newest technologies. It encompasses a family of activities that depends on information, computation, software, sensing and networking, while making use of cutting-edge materials and emerging capabilities such as nanotechnology. Advanced manufacturing is an especially potent propellant of future economic growth, distinguished by continual process improvement and rapid new product introduction. These critical features will lead to the building of lighter, more fuel-efficient automobiles, the creation of “needleless” tests for medical conditions like diabetes, and the fabrication of semiconductors with 10 times the current processing power.   Cont'd...

S2C Expands Kintex UltraScale Prototyping Solutions for Consumer-based IoT and Other Small to Medium-Sized Designs

Single KU115 Prodigy Logic Module Well-Suited for Calculation-Intensive Applications

Records 796 to 810 of 1692

First | Previous | Next | Last

Additive & 3D Printing - Featured Product

Bitflow is the leader in CoaXPress

Bitflow is the leader in CoaXPress

With the introduction of its Cyton and Karbon CXP frame grabbers, BitFlow has established itself as the leader in CoaXPress (CXP), a simple, yet powerful, standard for moving high speed serial data from a camera to a frame grabber. With CXP, video is captured at speeds of up to 6.25 Gigabits/Second (Gb/S). Simultaneously, control commands and triggers can be sent to the camera 20 Mb/S (with a trigger accuracy of +/- 2 nanoseconds). Up to 13 W of power can also supplied to the camera. All this happens over a single piece of industry standard 75 Ohm coaxial cable. Multiple CXP links can be aggregated to support higher data rates (e.g. four links provide 25 Gb/S of data). BitFlow CXP frame grabbers open the door to applications where cable cost, routing requirements and long distances have prevented the move to high resolution, high speed digital cameras. In many cases, existing coaxial infrastructure can be repurposed for CXP with very low installation costs.