Adidas reveals plans for 3D printing 'Speedfactory'

Corey Clarke for 3DPrintingIndustry:  Adidas is moving closer to a 3D printing shoe manufacturing revolution. As previously reported the sports shoe manufacturer used 3D printing to produce the Ultraboost Parley and 3D Runner releases in 2016. This year, Adidas are keen to up the tempo with their Speedfactory concept.

Industrial factories where 3D printing and robotics manufacture sneakers on-demand are at the core of the plan. Manufacturing will also become localized, eliminating costs associated with logistics and supply chains. Large-scale production at German Speedfactory in Ansbach is set for mid-2017, with Adidas expecting to create 500,000 shoes a year in the future. While in the U.S, Adidas has announced plans to create a Speedfactory in Atlanta in late-2017.  Cont'd...

Asia Pacific's leading 3D printing trade show returns to Singapore this 14 - 15 February 2017

USA's Formlabs, Taiwan's DMP Electronics and Singapore's own Creatz3D Pte Ltd among international exhibitors

Rize to Introduce the New Rize™ One 3D Printer at SOLIDWORKS World 2017

Rize Inc., maker of the world's only industrial 3D printing technology capable of producing manufacturing and end-use parts on demand in the office or additive manufacturing lab, announced today that, for the first time, SOLIDWORKS World 2017 attendees will meet the new Rize One 3D printer first hand in Rize booth #406.

Indie Meets Indiegogo To Help Shape The Future of 3D Printing

Mumbai's Maher Soft Launches New Fully-Developed Industrial-Grade Desktop 3D Printer

ASU site of largest academic additive manufacturing center in the southwest US

Gail Overton for LaserFocusWorld:  By forming a partnership with Concept Laser (Grapevine, TX), Honeywell Aerospace (Phoenix, AZ), and Phoenix Analysis & Design Technologies (PADT; Tempe, AZ), the largest additive manufacturing (AM) research facility in the Southwest is now on the Polytechnic campus of the Polytechnic School at Arizona State University (ASU; Tempe, AZ). The 15,000 square foot center holds over $2 million of plastic, polymer, and 3D metal printing equipment and the Polytechnic School at ASU offers the only manufacturing engineering undergraduate degree in Arizona and is one of only 22 ABET accredited manufacturing engineering programs in the United States.

The lab has a Concept Laser M2 cusing and Mlab cusing machine which are dedicated to 3D metal printing, also known as metal AM. Unlike conventional metal fabrication techniques, AM produces fully dense metal parts by melting layer upon layer of ultrafine metal powder. The Polytechnic School is using the machines for a wide range of research and development activities including materials development and prototyping complex mechanical and energy systems.  Cont'd...

Lloyd's Register and TWI launch two new projects to advance take-up of additive manufacturing

Collaboration aimed at two aspects of additively manufactured (AM) parts: regulatory compliance and joining of AM

Oracle Cloud Applications Drive Carbon's Quest to Lead in 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing

Carbon to streamline business processes across organizational development, manufacturing, finance, and services

The 3D Printers of CES

Brian Benchoff for HACKADAY:  CES is over, and now we can take a step back, distance ourselves from the trade show booths, and figure out where 3D printing will be going over the next year.

The Hype Cycle is a great way to explain trends in fads and technological advances. VR and autonomous cars are very early on the Hype Cycle right now. Smartphones are on the plateau of productivity. 3D printing is head-down in the trough of disillusionment.

For this year’s CES, 3D printing is not even a product category. In fact, the official documentation I found at Prusa’s booth listed their company in the ‘Assistive Technologies’ category. These are dark days for the public perception of 3D printing. 

The perception of 3D printing has been tied inexorably to Makerbot. Makerbot presented the only 3D printer on The Colbert Report. Only Makerbot had their 3D printing storefronts featured on CNN. It’s been like this for half a decade, and hopefully things will get better.  Cont'd...

Cognex Announces Acquisitions in 3D Vision and in Industrial ID

Cognex acquires Chiaro Technologies in 3D Vision and Webscan in Industrial ID

3D graphene: MIT scientists develop super-light, super-strong structure

Weston Williams for The Christian Science Monitor:  Many scientists consider graphene to be one of the most potentially useful materials ever created. The atom-thick chain of carbon atoms are strong, light, and promise many applications, from energy storage to pollution removal to waterproof coating.

While graphene has been studied since the 1940s, scientists have had considerable trouble constructing it into a structurally useful form on a three-dimensional level. But now, scientists at MIT have figured out how to build up graphene into useful, 3-D shapes with the potential to be lighter and stronger than steel.

The new research marks an important step forward for the material. The hexagonal structure is essentially an "unrolled" carbon nanotube only an atom thick, usually only functional on a two-dimensional level. Despite this limitation, graphene is more than 100 times stronger than steel, and converting that two-dimensional strength into a structure usable for three-dimensional building materials has for years been something of a holy grail for graphene researchers. And now, scientists may be one step closer to that conversion.  Cont'd...

GE Additive Education Program Accepting Applications from Schools for 3D Printers

GE is now accepting applications from schools for the GE Additive Education Program (AEP). GE will invest $10 million over the next five years in two educational programs, to develop pipelines of future talent in additive manufacturing. Enabling educational institutions to provide access to 3D printers will help accelerate the adoption of additive manufacturing, worldwide.

Quiet and High Speed 3D Printer - FabPod™ Silent

Quiet and High Speed 3D Printer - FabPod™ Silent Japan's Bonsailab exhibits at CES2017

CES 2017 - MarkForged 3D prints metal

From CES 2017: From the company that revolutionized 3D printing with composite carbon fiber, comes a breakthrough in metal. The Metal X greatly accelerates innovation, delivering metal parts overnight using a new technology at a fraction of the cost. Leave 20th century manufacturing in the dust and create anything from industrial replacement parts to injection molds to working prototypes.

Materialise Collaborates with Siemens to Advance Additive Manufacturing

Agreement will focus on streamlining and simplifying the design to additive manufacturing process

3D printer builds a cube from a vat of goo … using a phone screen

Ed Oswald for DigitalTrends:  What if we told you that you could be holding in your hand a key piece to your next 3D printer? If Taiwan-based 3D-printing startup T3D has anything to do with it, your smartphone will have you creating 3D objects in no time. While the printing surface contains a mechanically operated plate that is dipped into a special resin, it’s your smartphone that tells it how to operate.

From within the printer’s app, you select the shape you’d like to print. From there, the light from the screen moves through a series light patterns necessary to create the object in a special light sensitive resin. While it works a bit slow — as you can see, the cube structure in the video demo above takes over seven hours to print on an early prototype — it’s like nothing we’ve seen before.  Cont'd...

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